Archive for December, 2006

Are Parents Food Allergy Paranoid With New Babies?

This was pointed out to us by Clark Bartram a Paediatrian from the US.

It’s from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. See below for the abstract. The full report is $20US which you can get from their site.

I totally agree with these findings. I’d say that parents of new borns, that don’t have previous experience with food allergies would not be equipped to make a proper call on their childs condition, I know that we weren’t. Especially if the childs symptoms weren’t anaphylactic. It’s pretty obvious that there is an issue if you are off to the hospital with a dying child.

Aaron

Newport and Portsmouth, United Kingdom
Background

There are very few population-based studies investigating the incidence of food hypersensitivity during the first year of life.
Objective

To determine the incidence of parentally reported food hypersensitivity and objectively diagnosed food hypersensitivity during the first year of life.
Methods

A birth cohort was recruited (n = 969). At 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, information regarding feeding practices and reported symptoms of atopy were obtained. At 1 year, infants underwent a medical examination and skin prick testing to a battery of allergens. Symptomatic infants underwent food challenges.
Results

Adverse reactions to foods were reported by 132 (14.2%) parents at 3, 83 (9.1%) at 6, 49 (5.5%) at 9, and 65 (7.2%) at 12 months. Of the subjects, 1.0% (8/763) were sensitized to aeroallergens and 2.2% (17/763) to food allergens. Between 6 and 9 months and 9 and 12 months, 1.4% (14/969) and 2.8% (27/969) infants were diagnosed with food hypersensitivity on the basis of open food challenges and 0.9% (9/969) and 2.5% (24/969) on the basis of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges. Cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity by 12 months was 4% (39/969; 95% CI, 2.9% to 5.5%) on the basis of open food challenges and 3.2% (31/969; 95% CI, 2.2% to 4.5%) on the basis of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges.
Conclusion

Between 2.2% and 5.5% of infants have food hypersensitivity in the first year of life. The rate of parental perception of food hypersensitivity is higher than the prevalence of atopic sensitization to main food allergens or objectively assessed food hypersensitivity.
Clinical implications

In the first year of life, the rate of parentally perceived food hypersensitivity is considerably higher than objectively assessed food hypersensitivity.